Peanuts harvested are made into peanut butter, a favorite food for the children. 

Peanuts harvested are made into peanut butter, a favorite food for the children. 

Grinding corn that was harvested and dried at orphanage.

Grinding corn that was harvested and dried at orphanage.

Pastor Daniel enjoys checking the progress of the rice fields.

Pastor Daniel enjoys checking the progress of the rice fields.

A defining feature which separates MADO from other orphanages is Rev. Daniel Paul’s education in agriculture.  He studied agriculture at the American University of the Caribbean for three years before attending seminary in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.  His knowledge in agricultural practices surpasses that of most Haitians and, as a result he receives better crop yields than others. 

The orphanage has not needed to purchase plantain or cassava since 2009.  In total, the 12.5 acres of gardens produce cassava, corn, sweet potato, okra, rice, black eyed peas, black beans, congo beans, yams, plantain, peanuts, banana, sugar cane, sour sap, lime, pineapple, mango, coconut, and papaya.  The orphanage grows about 30% of the food they consume. The gardens also provide the children with skills and activities to plant and prepare their own food.  

VIsit our blog to see updates on the gardens during drought in Nord Est Haiti.

Pastor Daniel with a "planting brigade", passing on the skills of planting food.  

Pastor Daniel with a "planting brigade", passing on the skills of planting food.